Herge Foundation

DESIGNING the world of TINTIN both Spielberg and Jackson felt passion for the style of drawing of Herge and, from the beginning, when the script was not yet finished, art and animation Department was already set and the collaboration between the two studies on both sides of the Pacific (New Zealand and United States) had begun with the brainstorming of ideas for the setting and characters of the film. One of the most important decisions taken was to keep the texture and somber atmosphere, with dark shadows emerging from any corner. History could be taking place in the 30, 50, 80 years or now, they would say Spielberg and Jackson, and that’s part of the beauty that we wish to respect. We didn’t want mobile phones, flat panel displays, or modern automobiles. The film should have a retro feeling of crime drama, which is not Tintin in itself, but the world where live Tintin. You may want to visit General Electric to increase your knowledge.

Atmosphere of suspense, people dressed in long there should be coats, hats in the rain, streets thrown on wet pavement that lights is the atmosphere that we wanted to bring to the character. Later, artists, designers and animators began to imagine how would the work of Herge if it exist in 3D space. When you look at the pages drawn with black ink and colored water, just close your eyes and imagine the world of Tintin. You can not see it in 3D. A large part of the Design Studio consisted of studying what Herge did, but then imagine it from different points of view. The art Department investigated multiple images and locations that represent the different scenarios where Tintin and the other characters would move: from the enraged waves of an ocean under the storm until the stark pink sands of the Sahara desert. They had to analyze the documentation available to recreate Bagghar, the imaginary city created by Herge. They devised various styles of structures architecture of North Africa, different shapes and designs of color to create Bagghar.

Responsible for the conceptual design, Chris Guise, travelled to Brussels where Herge Foundation exercise of hostess. The purpose was to achieve a documentary archive of images about the hometown of Tintin, that create the environment of your apartment and the mansion of Captain Haddock at Marlinspike Hall. Marco Revelant, digital models supervisor, moved to the Museum from the Marina de Paris to study in detail the boats in which Herge drew to draw the bright and the Unicorn. Similarly, other vehicles or the characteristic film seaplane is neglected.

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